Blogs & News

news : Tell us what you think about our garden

We are looking at ideas to develop and improve the garden at Elizabeth Gaskell's House and would like to get input from our visitors. Today, the garden has been planted to show the sort of garden that the Gaskells enjoyed. The choice of plants has been informed by references in Elizabeth’s letters and novels, as well as by Victorian garden history.  The garden is intended to give as much enjoyment today as it did in Elizabeth’s time. Volunteer...

news : New Crafternoon Teas at Elizabeth Gaskell’s House

NEW for 2018 - Join us for a Thursday Crafternoon Tea workshop, 1.30– 4pm.  Learn a new crafting skills and take home a lovely hand-made creation. 15 March - Cotton Patchwork Lavender Bags Make a Suffolk puff patchwork lavender bag from scraps of floral cotton and decorate with beads and embroidery. 19 April - Victorian Crazy Patchwork in Silk Learn the technique of Victorian-style Crazy Patchwork using vibrant silk materials, and embellish with embroidery. 17 May - Crochet Traditional...

blog : January in the Garden

  The first flowers of the year are starting to show themselves. We have primroses, snowdrops, witch-hazel, crocus and cyclamen in flower and shoots of daffodils, tulips and scilla coming up through the soil. So something to look forward to. Photography by Chris Tucker, Volunteer Gardener

blog : So long, and thanks for all the cake

It is with a heavy heart that I write my final blog for Elizabeth Gaskell’s House (or Lizzie G’s as I referred to it throughout my time volunteering here- I like to think that she had a secret rapper identity, writing by day and composing her rhymes by night, William being her groupie of course!) I felt that as an active blogger for the House’s website  it was only right to conclude my time here with one last...

blog : Are you nesh?

It all started with a conversation that I had with another volunteer on a chilly winter’s morning. As I sat there wrapped with the throw from the chaise lounge on my lap (shhh, don’t tell) and with my winter coat draped over my shoulders, said volunteer (who, at her request, shall not be named) called me “nesh”. Being a typical Southerner only familiar with cockney rhyming slang, I hadn’t the faintest idea what she was talking about. I...