Blogs & News

news : What’s New in 2018

Manchester’s literary landmark, Elizabeth Gaskell’s House, will offer visitors a wealth of new cultural treats in 2018.  As Manchester celebrates its UNESCO City of Literature status, the beautifully-restored home of one of its finest and most famous Victorian writers has some treats in store, including the exhibition of a letter to one of Elizabeth Gaskell’s servants, discovered in the attic during restoration work last year, and the debut in the house of an impressive Italian artwork in the...

news : Working with Ed Lab at MMU

At the end of 2017 we began working with a group of students from the EdLab (School of Childhood, Youth and Education Studies) at Manchester Metropolitan University in order to  develop the houses's resources and activities for when children visit with their families, or on school trips. We asked the students to develop  a number of resources including self-guided activities that will engage children and their families and help them to learn about the house, Elizabeth’s literature and...

news : A City that Boasts Many Diversions…..

We were incredibly excited to see Elizabeth Gaskell's House featured in the New York Times over the Christmas period as part of feature on 36 hours in Manchester. The journalist writes that visiting Manchester "is an exercise in peeling back layers of a gritty, glorious urban area full of culture, sports and sleek new hotels". We were doubly lucky that one of our volunteers was able to pick up a copy on her travels over the holidays. For...

news : Installation of della Robbia style Altarpiece

In 1898, Elizabeth Gaskell’s daughters, Meta and Julia, purchased a nineteenth century della Robbia style altarpiece which was gifted to the recently founded Whitworth Art Gallery. In a happy reversal of generosity, it has now been given to Elizabeth Gaskell’s House by the Whitworth Art Gallery and is on display in the hallway in the house from January 2018. Elizabeth Gaskell, whose writings often made reference to the plight of the urban poor, during the Industrial Revolution, loved...

blog : Tracking down John Johnson

When you find a letter wedged in the brickwork under the roof trusses of the stable block at the Elizabeth Gaskell House, two questions immediately spring to mind-who sent it and why? (you can read about the recipient in an earlier blog) We know from the signature that his name was James Johnston and that in 1853 he was living in John St., Maryport, although sadly he does not provide a house number. This is part of John...