Blogs & News

: MACFEST : Turkish Floral Art Workshop

Join us for an exciting Turkish/Ottoman illuminated floral arts workshop with Ashfia Ashrif, an artist and a student of Tehzip/ illumination.During the demonstration she will also speak about her journey as an artist and showcase some of her work. Introduced by: Fiona Fulton, Neighbourhood Engagement Officer. Tickets £5. Please note that booking for this event must be done via MACFEST Eventbrite page and that we cannot take bookings via the House.

: Stitching our own Stories

In this textile oral history workshop we will be focusing on sharing our connections, memories and involvement with Elizabeth Gaskell’s House. We will start the workshop with a small free writing workshop to get our ideas and memories flowing. Then we will move to the textiles portion of the workshop where you will each make your own quilt panel telling your personal story with the Elizabeth Gaskell's House. Each quilt square is a book panel, a space to

: Trailblazing Threads! Celebrating forgotten Manchester women

Join us for two free Stitching Workshops at Elizabeth Gaskell’s House on Thursday 26 January & Thursday 2 February 2023: 1-3pm. Come and help us make a beautiful bunting to celebrate International Women’s Day! The workshops will be run by a local co-operative, StitchUp, and no experience is necessary. All materials and refreshments will be provided. Please sign up soon as places are limited by emailing alironan61@gmail.com  Please note that this event is not being organised by Elizabeth

: Online Course: Reading Childhood – Little Women

What do you think of when you imagine Victorian children? Demure little things who are seen and not heard? This is certainly not true of the child characters of the great Victorian novelists. In Jane Eyre and David Copperfield, Charlotte Bronte and Charles Dickens show us how trauma can influence character development as well as spelling out the responsibilities adults have towards children. George Eliot and our own Elizabeth Gaskell give us rounded, observant and intelligent young girls

: Online Course: Reading Childhood – Molly Gibson in Wives and Daughters

What do you think of when you imagine Victorian children? Demure little things who are seen and not heard? This is certainly not true of the child characters of the great Victorian novelists. In Jane Eyre and David Copperfield, Charlotte Bronte and Charles Dickens show us how trauma can influence character development as well as spelling out the responsibilities adults have towards children. George Eliot and our own Elizabeth Gaskell give us rounded, observant and intelligent young girls