News

From our House to yours

Posted
14th October 2020
in news

Are you missing our lively literary events here at Elizabeth Gaskell’s House? Well, you can still enjoy our fascinating talks and discussions, because we’ve moved them online!

So when you can’t go out, stay in and join us!

From our house to yours, we’re bringing you our fabulous talks programme in a series of cosy evening lectures this autumn and winter.

Want to be suitably spooked for Halloween? Tune in for our talk on Elizabeth Gaskell’s spine-tingling gothic tales on 28 October. Get your ticket here.

What was the ‘grand quarrel’ between two titans of Victorian womanhood – Elizabeth Gaskell and Florence Nightingale? Find out in Naomi Stadlen’s illuminating talk on 4 November. Get your ticket here.

Take a dive into the Victorian Manchester of Elizabeth Gaskell’s first novel, Mary Barton, as Dr Diane Duffy leads us through a tour of the book’s locations in Mary Barton’s Manchester on 11 November. Get your ticket here

And get in the mood for a traditional Christmas: pull up your favourite chair, grab yourself a mince pie and enjoy Anthony Burton’s talk on Christmas Revels in Victorian Manchester on December 2. Get your ticket here.

Talks take place on Wednesday evenings from 7-8pm, and tickets are £3.

And if you’re yearning for a good old literary discussion, we’ve got that covered too. Our well-loved book club is now online to bring colour and companionship to your winter afternoons. Pick up a book, get yourself a cuppa and join us in reading – and re-reading – classic fiction. Highlights for autumn and winter include iconic 1920s fiction by Alberto Moravia, E.M. Forster and Katherine Mansfield.

New members are warmly welcomed, so please join book group leader Karen Laird on the 3rd Thursday of every month from 1:00 – 2:15 pm.

Places are limited, so please pre-book (£3 donation per session).

We've got a house...it certainly is a beauty...I must try and make the house give as much pleasure to others as I can.’

Elizabeth Gaskell, in a letter to her friend Eliza Fox in 1850.